3 inspiring customer feedback examples

Companies say they want customer feedback, but knowing how to get it and use it effectively is another story.

Creating a poll, for example, is just one customer feedback tactic. On its own, it doesn’t necessarily have a lot of power. But as part of a wider, robust customer feedback strategy, it has great potential.

As competition for consumer attention becomes tougher, good customer feedback means being responsive 24-7, and — more important — making customers feel that their feedback was heard and acted upon.

Some companies do this better than others, but every business can learn from those who have been there and done that. Below are three great customer feedback examples and takeaways that every business can use to inspire better results.

1. Uber

Uber, the popular ride-sharing service, enables customers to rate their drivers in real time with a simple tap in the Uber mobile app. The process of giving feedback is embedded in the customer journey (both the actual ride and the marketing journey) and feels seamless and natural for the customer.

Since the app prompts the user to provide feedback immediately, customers are more likely to remember their experience, good or bad, and record it correctly. Moreover, Uber uses feedback as currency — drivers know that their passenger feedback will impact their future income, which motivates them to make an extra effort to get a good review.

In the case of Uber, feedback is a fundamental element in the experience that ensures customers get the best service not just today but in the future.

What works

Easy user interface

The survey is super easy to complete — just a quick tap on the number of stars you want to give the driver in ready-made categories such as professionalism, driving, and music. The downside is that there isn’t an easy option for adding more information, but for most people, easy is better and will result in more accurate responses.

Embedded in the checkout process

The review is built into the checkout process — on the spot, in real time. Giving feedback is a natural part of the Uber experience. The company doesn’t need to pester customers after the fact when their attention is elsewhere and they aren’t interested in providing feedback.

Community responsibility

Users know that other passengers have kept them safe by ranking drivers honestly, which motivates them to do the same for others. Feedback becomes a source of connection and responsibility within the community of users.

2. JetBlue

Airlines have notoriously terrible customer service, and, likely, most of the feedback they get isn’t exactly stellar. So it makes sense that some of their customer feedback formats seem more like examples of how to avoid interacting with their customers rather than how to engage with them.

JetBlue aimed to differentiate itself from the competition by being great at customer service. “We call ourselves a customer service company that happens to fly planes,” says Laurie Meacham, manager of customer commitment.

Unlike other airlines that balk at managing negative feedback, JetBlue shines at maintaining an active and responsive conversation with its customers. Customers who engage with them get a clear message that they are heard, their opinion is valued, and the time they invested in giving feedback won’t go to waste.

What works

Cross channel

The JetBlue team listens for feedback everywhere. They are very active on all social media channels and respond in real time. Also, the team isn’t siloed. When a problem is tagged on social media, the team gets it to the person who can solve the customer’s problem right away.

Flex-format

Customer feedback is an actual conversation. Rather than limiting customers to set forms and rubrics, the JetBlue team responds to thoughts and concerns however customers present them.

Customer-driven

JetBlue listens to what’s important to the customer and doesn’t limit customer input to the data points the company is focused on. They’re on 24-7, responding to customers whenever issues arise.

Proactive

JetBlue makes every effort to be proactive when it comes to customer service and responding to feedback, trying to solve problems before they escalate. They also take individual situations into account rather than using policies to define every response to feedback, an approach that’s more time-consuming and resource-heavy, but also far more effective.

3. Best Buy

Less than a decade ago, Best Buy was floundering. After steady growth in the 90s and early 2000s, shares plunged in 2012 as online shopping became more popular. Best Buy was seen as out of touch with customer demand.

Three years later, the company was back on track, largely due to an increased focus on customer feedback. Best Buy initiated an innovative strategy that awarded customers points for giving feedback on its products and services.

What works

Points for feedback

Best Buy actively awards its customers for giving feedback. This both encourages the customers to invest the time and effort, and sends a message that the feedback is so important to the company, it’s willing to monetize it.

Empowering employees to seek out feedback 

Best Buy employees use a proprietary intranet app, Voices of Consumers through Employees, to gather customer feedback in real time. They can then immediately forward feedback to the company’s customer insights department. 

Customer feedback: It’s worth it

Finding the right customer feedback format isn’t easy, and when it’s done wrong, it can end up causing more harm than good. However, as these customer feedback examples demonstrate, when brands invest in smart, innovative practices, customer feedback can become one of the most powerful tools for business growth.

This article is originally published on Mar 22, 2021, and updated on Apr 16, 2021.
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Data collection analyst. Seeing life in 1's and 0's. Can't resist to a good cup of coffee.

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